Mature Life Features

Cecil Scaglione, Editor

Posts Tagged ‘#dementia

Haven’t Seen Any Pictures . . .

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. . .of Bigfoot for quite awhile.

Maybe he’s moved.

Dementia Debilitating by Any Name

A lot of time and talent has been devoted to eliminating or finding cures for all manner of diseases, developing drugs that diminish debilitation, and producing prosthetics that help make coping comfortable. Despite all the intelligence applied to the science of lengthy living, little is known about enhancing our brain’s power, particularly as it ages.

Dementia — its causes and cures — is still a mystery to the best medical minds. Experienced experts even disagree on the best ways to avoid or alleviate its ravages. Play mental-agility games, such as crossword puzzles, some say. Learn a language to foster the brain’s flexibility. Travel. Join social groups. Stay active. Exercise to maintain a healthy blood flow to the brain. Eat foods containing chemicals that stimulate brain activity and cells.

All of these may be safe and sane advice for anyone wishing to stay healthy, but there’s still no cure for such degenerative brain diseases as Alzheimer’s. The inexorably inevitable result is loss of memory, identity and mobility if death does not intervene. Alzheimer’s disease ambushes a new victim every minute. More than 5 million people in this country reportedly suffer from it. That number is expected to triple over the next three decades as the population ages.

Written by Cecil Scaglione

December 18, 2022 at 2:00 am

Posted in Aging, News / Events

Tagged with ,

Switching to Orange Juice . . .

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. . . has made my mornings

much more enjoyable.

It mixes with my vodka

much better than coffee.

Listen to Help Alzheimer’s Victims

A friend has a running gag that he received a solicitation for a contribution to the Alzheimer’s Association but he forgot where he put it. It’s his bit of gallows humor to forget the fact that more than 6 million Americans are victims of this disorder.

The association urges victims to be candid about their disease and, at the appearance of its signs, to discuss their symptoms with family and friends. Maintaining open lines of communication with people doomed by dementia is critical to keeping victims, caregivers, relatives and friends on as even a keel as possible as the disability progresses.

The first step recommended by the AA to everyone around an Alzheimer’s sufferer is to listen. Communicating with an Alzheimer’s victim requires patience and understanding, so those around such a person must be good listeners. And they must let the sufferer know they are listening, are being patient, and are trying to understand what he or she is saying.

If the person is having difficulty finding the right word or phrase, encourage him or her to take their time and continue to explain. Don’t cut in and correct the speaker. You can repeat what was said if you feel some clarification is needed.

Written by Cecil Scaglione

December 17, 2022 at 12:00 am

Posted in Aging, Health, Humor / Quote

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People Keep Asking . . .

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. . . why I take so many naps.

Because, I tell them,

it prevents aging,

especially when you take them

when you’re behind the wheel.

Listen to Communicate with Alzheimer’s Victims

A friend has a running gag in which he tells someone he received a solicitation for a contribution to the Alzheimer’s Association but he forgot where he put it. It’s his form of gallows humor to forget the fact that some 5 million Americans are victims of this disorder.

The AA urges victims to be candid about their disease and, at the appearance of its signs, to discuss their symptoms with relatives and friends. Maintaining open lines of communication with people facing dementia are critical to keeping victims, caregivers, relatives and friends on as even a keel as possible as disabilities progress.

The first of a half dozen steps recommended by the AA to everyone around an Alzheimer’s sufferer is to listen. And let the sufferer know they are listening, are being patient, and are trying to understand what he or she is saying.

Many times the emotions being expressed by the victim are more important than the words used. Tone of voice can help you search for the feelings behind the phrases. If you don’t understand what’s being said, ask  the Alzheimer’s-afflicted person to point or gesture to let you know what he or she wants.

Written by Cecil Scaglione

October 18, 2022 at 2:00 am

Posted in Aging, Health

Tagged with , ,