Mature Life Features

Cecil Scaglione, Editor

Posts Tagged ‘San Diego

As President of the San Diego Press Club . . .

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. . . five decades ago, just how long ago that was smacked me in the face as I skimmed over the list of winners of the most recent club journalism awards.

The only names I was a familiar with were those of the long-ago folks the awards were named for.

Written by Cecil Scaglione

October 28, 2021 at 5:00 am

“I’m not a sports fan” . . .

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. . . admits No. 1 son, Michael,Football Player

whenever discussion of the Chargers or the Padres or sports stadiums or whatnot is broached,

and points out quickly that  performance has proven and is proving that

“San Diego is the perfect place to be if you’re not a sports fan.”

Written by Cecil Scaglione

October 3, 2016 at 1:00 pm

Seems Like the San Diego Chargers . . .

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clockalarm. . . have got a lot better at playing hardball than football.

— Cecil Scaglione

Written by Cecil Scaglione

July 17, 2015 at 7:22 am

Posted in Humor / Quote

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Free Lunch

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By Cecil Scaglione

Mature Life Features

After a lifetime of being told there’s no such thing as a free lunch, I got one this week.

Well, sorta.

It was during a date made by my wife, Bev, to meet a long-time friend at the Valley View Casino in north San Diego County. The casino-restaurant-hotel complex calls itself “San Diego’s Favorite” and boasts about featuring lobster under a portion of its glass-covered buffet counters.

The event dictated that we not worry about what didn’t get done around the house after the kids and grandkids returned to Phoenix Tuesday, wrapping up a weekend visit. We got most things re-arranged and cleaned up but the rest was left until after Bev’s auld-lang-syne appointment because she didn’t want to be so weary she couldn’t enjoy re-gossiping about the old days and catching up on the new days with her former neighbor, who had moved to Hawaii for several years before returning to Southern California after her husband died.

It took us about an hour to drive up to the casino, one of a dozen or so in the county. As the name suggests, it’s perched on a high hill overlooking the countryside that’s made up mostly of a deep valley surrounded by scrubby-looking hills peppered with scrubby looking rocks, shrubs and trees.

As the ladies dived into reminiscing while feeding a couple of slot machines, I went to a nearby counter and registered for a Player’s Cub card so the San Pascual Indian tribe could track how much money I lose. And I was told I get a free buffet, either lunch or dinner, with my new card.

I rushed back to tell Bev and she decided to get herself a free lunch — er, Players Club card — too.

As it turned out, the ladies quit feeding the machines and decided to feed themselves about the time I was ready to build my fortune. Bev’s wins and losses had bounced up and down and she wound up around $20 down. Since the buffet costs $19.95, she broke even. And, since I never got the opportunity to test my luck, I got a free lunch.

The operators have every right to boast about the buffet. It was extensive and fresh, with plenty of variety. But no lobster at lunch, only at dinner.

 

Written by Cecil Scaglione

July 11, 2013 at 8:48 pm

On a Mission in San Diego

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By Cecil Scaglione

Mature Life Features

Played tourist at home this weekend and took the camera to visit Mission San Diego de Alcala.
It’s worth spending some time there, especially when you move from the busy front into the quieter and more spacious courtyard encapsulated by the Spanish-colonial structure housing a museum, priests’ quarters, chapel, and more (like public bathrooms). Happened upon a wedding in the parish that Franciscan Junipero Serra established in 1769 as the first of the 21 missions that form the spine of California.
The original Spanish settlement was where Old Town is now, below the Presidio tower on the hill that allowed settlers to get a strategic early view of any ships sailing into San Diego Bay.
The friars decided to move their neophyte native converts away from the lascivious soldiers so they moved the church and school about five miles up the San Diego River – the distance in which tolling bells could be heard.
Among the exhibits is a showcase of models of the missions stretching from here to north of San Francisco in the order in which they were founded. It’s a quick look at California’s early development.
While they were situated within a day’s march of each other – anywhere from about 30 to 50 miles – they weren’t founded in order from south to north. The next mission established after San Diego was in Carmel just south of San Francisco.
However, to follow El Camino Real (The King’s Highway) formed by the mission chain, drive up Highway 5 to the largest mission in the chain – Mission San Luis Rey in Oceanside. Next is San Juan Capistrano and then there’s…

Written by Cecil Scaglione

May 5, 2013 at 6:36 pm