Mature Life Features

Cecil Scaglione, Editor

Posts Tagged ‘walking

Early-Morning Episodes . . .

leave a comment »

. . . as seen on pre-breakfast bike rides around Gilbert, Arizona, include:

— a shout-out lime-green polyester shirt housing a pony-tailed blond skimming along a side-street sidewalk followed by her beau in black shorts, black T-shirt and black sandals pedaling a black high-handle-barred coaster bike.

— two grille-to-grille pickups plugging up a driveway and blocking half the street while the backed-into-the-drive vehicle sucks battery juice through what look like black straws from the truck with its back to traffic.

— power mowers competing against each other in green swards across the street from on another as landscapers trim bushes and blow leaves into piles before the sun gets angry.

— teens — bored, perched on curbs, chatting in couples, texting or gaming, a few even waving — gathered at school-bus stops.

— school buses boring into traffic without conscience.

— bikers in bike lanes with teeth gritted who rarely wave back as they bust their buttocks to beat their previous times or distances or both.

— assorted dog-walkers of all attitudes and attire with an endless array of breeds and behaviors.

— householders, a few holding their morning coffee, turning on or off their front-yard sprinkler systems.

— young mothers, mostly in vans, dropping their children off at all-day holding tanks.

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Written by Cecil Scaglione

August 14, 2017 at 8:39 am

No Pain Required for Muscle Gain

leave a comment »

TootlinAlong

By

Cecil Scaglione

Mature Life Features

    You may be too tired to do any exercise. Or too lazy. But you’re never too old.

And you’re never too old to benefit from lifting weights, or strength exercises, according to the National Institutes of Health’s National Institutes of Aging.
That doesn’t mean you have to adopt the regimen of a Terminator body builder.  Nor do you have to spend hours at a gymnasium.
There a strength-exercise guide called “Exercise: a Guide from the National Institute on Aging” available on the Web at nia.nih.gov/exercise book or by calling toll-free (800) 222-2225. There’s also a video available through its Go4Life program on the website.
You don’t have to rush down to an athletic-equipment or sporting-goods store to pick up sets of bar bells, or ankle and hand weights.
There are many household items you can use.
A one-pint bottle of water or a 16-ounce can of peas can substitute for a one-pound bar bell, for example. Or you can fill empty milk jugs or cartons with water or sand.
An early step to take during any exercise program is to check with your doctor, especially if you’re among the 40 percent of Americans who’ve been sedentary for the past few years.
Keep in mind that there are many forms of non-strength exercise: walking, swimming, bicycling, jogging, gardening, tennis, and bowling are examples. None of these require a medical imprimatur if you don’t have any serious handicap or disease.
But it’s not a bad idea to do a bit of muscle-building even if you participate in some other form of activity. A tip to follow at all times is to exercise different groups of muscles. Never exercise the same group – legs, arms, back, stomach, chest, shoulders, or arms, for example – two days in a row. Give your muscles time to rest.
You should exercise your major muscles groups, such as shoulders, back, arms and legs, twice a week. And start slowly. Start with one pound weights. And don’t rush up the poundage.
Do 10 to 15 repetitions of each exercise. Take about three seconds to slowly lift or push a weight, hold that position  for a second, and take another three to five seconds to return to the original position.
Exhale as you lift or push a weight. Inhale when you relax and lower the weight to your original position. Don’t hold your breath while you’re doing exercises.
Once you can lift or push a weight 15 times easily with smooth, steady motions, you may increase the weight a couple of pounds as your muscles become stronger. This can take two to three weeks.
You should experience a bit of soreness and fatigue in the beginning. That’s normal. But you should not experience sore joints, pain, or exhaustion. Those are signs that you’re overdoing it. If any of this persists, check with your doctor again.
Just remember: forget “no pain, no gain.”
                      Mature Life Features, Copyright 2004

Written by Cecil Scaglione

January 4, 2013 at 12:05 am

Posted in Health

Tagged with , , , ,